Friday, August 26, 2016

Alexander and the Rhythm/Instrument Review!

One of my favorite children's books is the classic, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, by Judith Viorst. Artie Almeida has a wonderful lesson plan in her book, Mallet Madness, that serves as a great review activity for the beginning of the year! Not only does it review basic rhythms but you can also use it for an instrument technique refresher as well. Our HSES 2nd graders have really enjoyed this activity as we have gotten back into the swing of things in music class.

First we read the story together...


Next, we reviewed the quarter note, eighth notes, and quarter rest, and then I had the students discover the rhythm of the repeated phrase in the book, "...terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day."


I divided the students into 4 groups and each group practiced one part of the phrase. Then each group played their rhythm on their instruments and we put the phrase all together.


The woodblocks:


The tambourines:


The maracas:


The drums:



Then I read the book again, and each group played the rhythm on their instrument on the correct words. Great job, 2nd graders!


7 comments:

  1. I enjoyed this post but am wondering why the smiley faces over 2 of the students??

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    1. Thanks! They are not allowed to have their picture posted online so I just covered their face. :) Thanks for reading!

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  2. I do this lesson every year. It is one of my favorite books also! I also add "Australia" as a Crescendo Decrescendo.

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    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    2. Yes! I have done that with a few classes who were ready to add more detail but I usually run out of time. ;)

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  3. Thanks for the great idea! I usually just use rhythm sticks, but this will be a great review of different classroom instruments for my 2nd graders. How does the Australia part go?

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    1. I think the original lesson plan has students rolling a low C bar to create a crescendo/decrescendo on "Australia." I usually don't have time to add that in but if you have a really sharp class you could probably do it. :)

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